Human Environment Design Department

Department overview

The Human Environment Design Department explores the scientific approaches of humans, the environment, and their relationships which form the basis of design. Just as before, the environment surrounding humans is constantly changing but the speed of change will only continue to accelerate in the future.

The environment is made up of a natural environment with problems such as global warming and natural disasters as well as a social environment with communal units such as geographic regions, workplaces, and families. In addition, we are surrounded by goods and services created one after another with the newest technologies. Faced with these environmental changes, we are filled with hope but also uncertainty for the future. To create a better future environment and to minimize anxieties, we need to correctly understand humans and the environment. However, at the same time, the technologies and approaches to do so are also constantly changing. Science has unlocked further possibilities of discovering human characteristics and changes in the environment which were previously unknown to us.

This department hopes to contribute to the design of manufacturing and the society in the future through approaching humans and the environment with a scientific approach.

Members

                                                                                                                                                               
Shigeki Watanuki ProfessorKansei Science, Physiological Anthropology
Shigekazu Higuchi ProfessorPhysiological Anthropology, Chronobiology, Kansei Science
Hiroyuki Ito ProfessorPsychology
Naoyuki Oi Professor / Division DirectorUrban and Architectural Environmentology, Environmental Psychology
Tsuyoshi Okamoto Associate Professor Theoretical Natural Science
Chihiro Hiramatsu Associate ProfessorVisual Psychophysiology
Yoichi Kawamoto Assistant ProfessorUrban Environment
Yuki Motomura Assistant ProfessorPsychophysiology, Physiological Anthropology, KanseiScience