Copyright 2000 Yoshitaka Nakajima
WARNING ! Lower levels are recommended for initial playbacks
until safe levels can be determined for your ears and equipment.

Demonstrations of
Auditory Illusions and Tricks

2nd Edition

Supervisors:
Yoshitaka Nakajima*, Takayuki Sasaki**, & Gert ten Hoopen***

Technical Staff:
Daigoh Suetomi****, Ger Remijn*, Kyoko Kanafuka*
Yasunori Murakita*, & Noortje Jansen*****

Editorial Associate:
Yukiko Minenaga*

Adviser:
Albert S. Bregman******

* Kyushu Institute of Design, Fukuoka, Japan
** Miyagi Gakuin Women's College, Sendai, Japan
*** Leiden University, Leiden, The Netherlands
**** Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
***** Amsterdam University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
****** McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Contents

Introduction

I. The Gap Transfer Illusion

<1> A Long Glide Tone and a Short Glide Tone Crossing Each Other
<2> A Long Continuous Glide Tone and a Short Disrupted Glide Tone Crossing Each Other
<3> The Gap Transfer Illusion
<4> A Long Glide Tone and a Short Glide Tone with a Common Gap Crossing Each Other
<5> A Long Ascending Glide and Two Short Ascending Glides with a Common Gap.
<6> A Long Glide Tone and a Short Glide Tone Crossing Each Other in Opposite Phases

II. The Split-Off Effect

<7> The Split-Off Effect with Glides in Different Directions
<8> The Split-Off Effect with Glides in the Same Direction
<9> The Split-Off Effect with Physically Bouncing Components
<10> The Split-Off Effect with Repetition
<11> The Split-Off Effect with Repetition with an Additional Glide

III. Abstraction of Musical Melodies

<12> Successive Piano Tones
<13> Successive Piano Tones with the Sustaining Pedal
<14> A Melody of Silences

IV. The Continuity Illusion

<15> Illusory Continuity of a Steady-State Tone
<16> Illusory Continuity of a Glide Tone
<17> Illusory Continuity of a Glide Tone with a Frequency Jump
<18> A Backward Extension of a Tone
<19> Music Sound Restoration

V. Dynamic Pitch

<20> A Continuously Ascending or Descending Series of Pitches Shown by Complex Tones Whose Spectral Components are Spaced at Non-Octave Intervals
<21> A Continuously Ascending or Descending Series of Pitches Shown by Complex Tones with Periodicity and Quasi-Periodicity in Spectra
<22> A Continuously Ascending or Descending Series of Pitches Shown by Complex Tones without Spectral Periodicity

VI. Time Perception

<23> Interaural and Monaural Tempo Difference
<24> Overestimation of a Divided Time Interval
<25> Time-Shrinking
<26> A Discontinuous Change in Time Perception Caused by Time-Shrinking
<27> Time-Shrinking in Patterns Consisting of Three Empty Time Intervals

References / Acknowledgments

Archives




Contents Introduction Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter 3 Chapter 4
Chapter 5 Chapter 6 References Archives Demo Index Top Page